Faculty Directory

Scott MacDougall

Assistant Professor of Theology

Core Doctoral Faculty
At the GTU since
2015

Scott MacDougall was born and raised in Central New York. He attended college in the greater New York City area, receiving his BA from Hofstra University. Following a career in the not-for-profit sector, he undertook the formal study of theology. MacDougall received his MA in theology from the General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church in 2007 and his PhD in systematic theology from Fordham University in 2014. His research centers on ecclesiology and eschatology. He is interested in the difference a robust theological imagination of the future makes in how Christian community is lived out, both in the church itself and in the wider world. His first book, More Than Communion: Imagining an Eschatological Ecclesiology, was published in 2015 as volume 20 of Bloomsbury–T&T Clark’s Ecclesiological Investigations series. MacDougall has also published several articles and reviews and has contributed to online publications such as Religion Dispatches and the Huffington Post’s Religion section. MacDougall serves as Co-Editor in Chief of the Anglican Theological Review. 

Degrees and Certifications

PhD, Fordham University

MA, The General Theological Seminary

BA, Hofstra University

Research and Teaching Interests
  • Systematic Theology
  • Ecclesiology
  • Eschatology
  • Anglicanism
  • Embodiment and Sexuality
Selected Publications
  • with John Panteleimon Manoussakis, Theo-erotics: A Dialogue on Desire, Eugene, OR: Cascade, forthcoming.
  • "Bodily Communions: An Eschatological Proposal for Addressing the Christian Body Progrem," Dialog (2018): forthcoming.
  • “‘Coherent, Inclusive, Dialogical, Hospitable’: Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen’s Constructive Theological Method,” Anglican Theological Review, 2017.
  • More Than Communion: Imagining an Eschatological Ecclesiology, Bloomsbury–T&T Clark, 2015.
  • “The Covenant Conundrum: How Affirming an Eschatological Ecclesiology Could Help the Anglican Communion," Anglican Theological Review, 2012.
  • “Scapegoating the Secular: The Irony of Mimetic Violence in the Social Theology of John Milbank.” In Violence, Transformation, and the Sacred: “They Shall Be Called Children of God,” Orbis, 2012.
Courses Taught
  • Theology 1 and 2
  • Body, Desire and Transformation
  • Contemporary Angelican Theologians
  • Eschatology and Christian Practice
  • Contemporary Theologies of Church