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Madrasa-Midrasha | Summer Institute 2022

Tuesday, May 31st 2022, 9:00am to Friday, June 3rd 2022, 4:30pm
Dinner Board Room, Flora Lamson Hewlett Library, 2400 Ridge Road Berkeley, CA 94709

Summer Institute 2022
Sacred Texts: Language, Application, Performance

The Madrasa-Midrasha Program at the Graduate Theological Union is excited to present its 2022 Summer Institute, a series of workshops that will focus on language, textual, and calligraphy studies, as well as a film screening and discussion.

The cost for this program is $300. We have limited scholarships available for students enrolled in CJS/CIS/MM/ICP courses; please email Mahjabeen Dhala (mahdhala@gtu.edu) for more details.

Please see the tentative schedule, program offerings, and instructor bios below.
 

Register Here

 

Tentative Schedule

     Tuesday, May 31

8:40am - Breakfast

8:50am - Opening Remarks

9am-12pm - Language Workshop
Instructor: Madeline Wyse

12pm-1pm - Lunch

1pm-4pm - Text Studies
Instructors: Rabbi Dorothy Richman and Dr. Ahmed Khater

     Wednesday, June 1

8:40am - Breakfast

9am-12pm - Language Workshop
Instructor: Madeline Wyse

12pm-1pm - Lunch

1pm-4pm - Text Studies
Instructors: Rabbi Dorothy Richman and Dr. Ahmed Khater

4pm-5pm - Break

5pm-7pm - Film Screening (TBA) with light dinner
Instructor: Dr. Naomi Seidman

     Thursday, June 2

8:40am - Breakfast

9am-12pm - Language Workshop
Instructor: Madeline Wyse

12pm-1pm - Lunch

1pm-4pm - Text Studies
Instructors: Rabbi Dorothy Richman and Dr. Ahmed Khater

     Friday, June 3

8:40am - Breakfast

9am-12pm - Language Workshop
Instructor: Madeline Wyse

12pm-1pm - Lunch

1pm-2:30pm - Friday Prayer Break

2:30pm-4:30pm - Calligraphy Workshop
Instructors: Arash Shirinbab and Rabbi Peretz Wolf-Prusan, Moderated by Dr. Carol Bier

4:30pm-5pm - Closing Reception with light refreshments

 

Workshop Descriptions:

Text Studies: In our three sessions together, we will explore how the central text of Judaism, the Torah, is interpreted by layers of commentary and culture. Together, and in study pairs, we will examine texts discussing the Divine,  the law, and narrative. We will experience how interpretation can seek not just to answer questions but to open up inquiry itself.

 

Organizers & Workshop Leaders:

Deena Aranoff is Faculty Director of the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, CA. She teaches rabbinic literature, medieval patterns of Jewish thought, and the broader question of continuity and change in Jewish history. Her recent publications engage with the subject of childcare, maternity and the making of Jewish culture.
 

Carol Bier, a historian of Islamic Art, studies patterns as intersections of art and mathematics. As Research Scholar at the Center for Islamic Studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, CA, she has published widely on cultural aspects of geometry in Islamic art that inform a beauty of form, pattern and structure. She is concurrently Research Associate at The Textile Museum in Washington, DC (2001-present), where she served as Curator for Eastern Hemisphere Collections (1984-2001).

Mahjabeen Dhala is Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies and Director of the Madrasa-Midrasha Program at the GTU. Dr. Dhala's interdisciplinary research features an integration of classical theological Islamic texts as well as the kaleidoscope of modern feminist theories to confront and contribute to the rapidly developing discourse between faith and feminism.
 

Ahmed Khater is a lecturer of Islamic studies at the Graduate Theological Union, Saint Mary’s College (adjunct assistant professor), Islamic University of Minnesota, and was a lecturer of Arabic language at the University of California, Berkeley. He teaches and designs curriculum at Mishkah University, and he previously worked with Al-Azhar University’s Department of Islamic Studies in English to edit books and articles for the scholars of Al-Azhar.

Dorothy Richman serves as rabbi of Makor Or: Jewish Meditation, and teaches Torah throughout the Bay Area and beyond. She is a soulful leader of traditional and creative ritual, and released an album of original music called Something of Mine, available on Bandcamp.

 

Naomi Seidman is Chancellor Jackman Professor of the Arts at the University of Toronto in the Department for the Study of Religion and the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies. She is working on a book on Freud's Jewish languages.explores how in Jewish ritual time Passover marks the beginning of a psychological journey to Shavuot, the celebration of Sinai.
 

Arash Shirinbab is an award winning artist and calligrapher and has participated in over 40 exhibitions in the US, Spain, France, Poland, Italy, Canada, and Iran including Associazione Culturale Day One in Italy, San Diego Museum of Art Artists Guild in California, Triton Museum of Art in California, and the Kunsthaus-Berlin-Marbella Museum in Spain. Arash is the co-founder and director of the Ziya Art Center in Berkeley and the national Society of Arabic Script Calligraphers in America and has led several art and calligraphy workshops, classes, and collaborative projects in the US.

Peretz Wolf-Prusan came to the Bay Area to teach printmaking at UAHC Camp Swig and to study at the San Francisco Art Institute. After a decade of creating Ketubot (Illuminated Wedding Documents), printmaking, working in informal education, Wolf-Prusan and his family traveled back to Israel in 1985 to learn at the Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion in Jerusalem and Cincinnati. From 1990 to 2010, Wolf-Prusan served Congregation Emanu-El, San Francisco, as rabbi and senior educator.

Madeline Wyse is a doctoral candidate in Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures at UC Berkeley, specializing in comparative Islamic and Rabbinic Studies. Her current work focuses on intertextual relationships between midrash (exegesis of the Hebrew Bible) and tafsīr (exegesis of the Quran). Her research interests also include Islamic legal theory (uṣūl al-fiqh), Talmud, the social history of law, and theories of language.

 

 

This event is co-sponsored by the GTU's Center for the Arts & Religion (CARe). We would also like to thank the Walter & Elise Haas Fund for the generous support of the Madrasa-Midrasha Program at the GTU.